Monday, October 25, 2010

Journey to Atlanta - Act 1

On the way to Atlanta we drove through an area of cotton fields and got off the highway for a closer look and some photos. Not being from the South, cotton fields fascinate both of us. And for me, it is especially meaningful since so much of the US history we studied in school in Germany had to do with the American South, and so far cotton fields - in my mind - have been associated only with great cruelty and suffering.
Cotton, like hibiscus (and the Confederate Rose in one of my previous posts), belongs to the mallow family and it's obvious in the flowers. Actually, I was stunned at how delicate and pretty the flowers are.
Above a seed pod (I guess that's called a boll) right before breaking open and below one that has popped open.

I was just mesmerized by the rows of white-flecked plants...

and along the fields by the many flowering vines.
It certainly was worth a stop, don't you think?

Incidentally, Savannah played a huge role in the cotton market in the 19th century. The old cotton exchange building is still standing and beautiful! Click here to take a look.
Tomorrow, Act 2 of our day in Atlanta - the High Museum!

Happy Monday, everyone!!

20 comments:

  1. Amazing photos! I've never seen these before, thanks for sharing. :) xx

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  2. Wonderful fotos of a plant we don´t see much of in Germany:)....Winslow has "Husky-like" eyes but where did he get those markings? He is so striking!

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  3. Hi dear Silke, your photoes are so very beautifull...I never saw a cotton field,-it must be a wonderfull experience, as in Germany, here in Denmark, we have learned lots about the south-yes the flowers are so delicate, and sweet-
    Have a beautifull week, dear.
    Hugs,Dorthe

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  4. Hi Silke! Wow what gorgeous photos.I never saw a cotton plant.How interesting.Ive never been way down south I will have to go sometime.

    Have a nice new week!

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  5. Is it uber soft right from the plant? What did it feel like? What did the field smell like? I would love to grow a small field of cotton. It's quite fascinating.

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  6. I commented below on your astounding post of feelings, I hope you know how loved your art is and how wonderful you are as part of this microcosm of the Universe. I am getting my portfolio together for a licensing meeting in nov. and ahhh... the doubt friends visit sooo frequently. The truth is, I know it is like putting yourself out there and saying, "What do you think?" So, that is a vulnerable time. But, honestly, anything that creeps in like that undermines that what I do is create light. No one can judge a sunbeam. I would draw and paint for myself, always, anyway. So, that advice below from others is sooo true. I feel you are one of the most delightful sister friends I have ever met. I know that we will always have smiles for eachother, even if we can't visit all the times we wish we could. Like when you just know you can stop in for coffee at a old friends just because. So, I support you in your art and with my heart. You are a treasure as I have said. We believe in you and your painting gives me joy to no end every single day. If we leave this earth and have made one person feel special or given of ourselves for the joy of someone else we are a success, in my book, in my humble opinion. Take care friend and know you are light from within and you shine bright. Blessings.

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  7. It's funny how things can be looked at from different perspectives, isn't it?! While the cotton plants and their delicate flowers are pretty, when I see them they evoke unpleasant memories for me. They have very harsh thorny barbs that cut the hand if you try to pick the cotton off too fast. And being a black girl raised in the South, cotton, and the picking of cotton, had a whole other connotation! I'm glad I'm older and wiser and can put the cruelty in it's proper perspective...but still, it's hard to see just the beauty of the flower...if you know what I mean. :-/ Thanks for the post though Silke.

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  8. Dear PoetessWug,

    I do know what you mean! From my history and English lessons, I've only really ever associated great cruelty and suffering with cotton plants. That's why it was so amazing to be able to look at the beauty of the plant itself, which I had never done... I am glad you took my post in the spirit it was offered! I did not mean to bring up painful associations. Actually, as a German, I am super sensitive to topics that evoke great suffering inflicted on a people!

    Hugs, Silke

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  9. 'No one can judge a sunbeam.'

    your friend wonderous place has just this just perfectly.

    i too have never seen cotton plants, flowers, buds, pods or bolls. this is my first class education for this monday morning. i mean it!

    love
    kj

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  10. Silke, here in the desert they have always grown cotton with no associated slavery, just the ingenious minds of the pioneers who arrived here, looking at the barren desert and said "We shall grow cotton. We shall bring water from the mountains". That always thrills me to think of their fortitude. I need some of those cotton balls with the seed pod on them; they make the cutest little Cotton Pickin Angels for Christmas. **blows kisses** Deb

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  11. oh Silke!!! wow these photos are spectacular!!! talk about inspiration!!!!

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  12. Hi Silke! These photos are great! Love them! Sounds and looks like you had a great day! :)

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  13. These cotton plants are really neat. I'd love to photograph them the next time I come down your way. I can see myself taking pictures of the cotton fields in the late-day light. I have the feeling I could make some sensational photos.

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  14. I grew up in Tennessee but in the eastern side. I had never seen cotton until I was in my 20s!

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  15. You are so right Silke. Cotton fields have a totally negative story etched in my mind. It's great to see your photos which so such beauty!

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  16. Hi Silke..beautiful photos..nature's beauty is so intriguing isn't it!!! Wonderful post..and lovely sharings as always!
    have a sparkling night
    Kiki~

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  17. Ahem, ahem, ahem!!! How do we know that you really went to Atlanta and not Mississippi? I don't see an Atalanta sign on the photos. I want more photos. You have to show me. I am from Missourri!

    Hahahahaha! Hugs and kisses my dearest Silke. I am sick with the flu so that's a sterilized kiss and hug for you. Tsup!

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  18. Liebling Silke, you are very clever. I laughed until I coughed. Antivirus program. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Okay, you are so clever, I believe you now. You were in ATlanta. Tsup! Tsup! Tsup!!!

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  19. I've always taken cotton photos from the car, the next time I'll have to stop! Such pretty photos too.

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